Beethoven: Triple Concerto · Schumann: Piano Concerto

Posted by i kadek Mardika on Monday, March 12, 2012


"In the Triple Concerto, Argerich confirms her status among the great chamber-music players, responding to her partners with exemplary tact and verve." --Gramophone

"A breath-taking and addictive live performance." --BBC Music Magazine







Martha Argerich's caution in committing new items from her once extensive repertoire to disc is proverbial. So a warm welcome to her first recording of Beethoven's Triple Concerto where, with her esteemed colleagues Renaud Capuçon and Mischa Maisky, she relinquishes all sense of stardom and does what comes naturally; namely performing music with her friends and allowing the microphones to eavesdrop, as it were, on her unalloyed happiness. Renewing her love for Beethoven (the Third Concerto will hopefully follow and there is even a promise of an Emperor Concerto later this year in Japan) Argerich confirms her status among the great chamber-music players, responding to her partners with exemplary tact and verve. Listen to the sense of interplay at 945', to Argerich's reply to Maisky's eloquence in the central Largo, or to the almost comic relish at 450" of the finale's bustling and ceremonious Polonaise, and you will be aware of musicmaking caught on the wing and filled with an unselfconscious delight and enjoyment.

The performance of the Schumann (Argerich's third on disc) is so vital and assertive that you are stunned and gratified by her ability to recreate music she has performed countless times with the white heat of first love. The opening is launched with a wild thrust and, throughout, there are innumerable little spur-of-the moment details and asides, a quick drawing of attention to this or that felicity.

Of course, such playing is a personal taste and you would never confuse Argerich for a moment with regal Myra Hess or sober-suited Pollini in this music but, again, she carries all before her, allowing her playing to pulse with a nervous vitality that trumps even her own previous performances. She is skilfully partnered by Alexandre Rabinovitch-Barakovsky, a pianist and conductor who somehow holds the reins of his fiery and unpredictable steed. -- Bryce Morrison, Gramophone [9/2004]

MP3 320 · 148 MB   bmc0112

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